Tag Archives: chapel

Fort Hood Youth Group Designs Chaplain Statue

A youth ministry group was responsible for the design and creation of a 1,200 pound bronze statue that will soon grace the US Army Chaplain’s School in Fort Jackson, SC:

The statue was designed and created by a group of Fort Hood kids and teens under the direction of Steve Carter, who runs [Fort Hood’s Chapel Ministry] Bob’s Diner, a middle and high school youth ministry group. Weekly Arts Nights are held at the “diner,” where youth explore and create music, drama and art in a faith-based environment.

Carter noted one of the purposes of the design was to highlight the “immediacy” of the Chaplaincy.  The statue captures a moment immediately after a battle, in which a Chaplain is able to comfort a grieving Soldier.  As has been noted before, Chaplains are literally on the front lines of US military conflicts, serving those who serve.

Read more about Bob’s DinerPhoto credit: Rachel Parks, Fort Hood Public Affairs.

Chaplains Bring Messages of Hope, Religious Freedom

US military Chaplains are deployed in the Horn of Africa

to establish lines of communication with local religious leaders.

Chaplain (CAPT) Jon Cutler and Chaplain (LtCol) David Terrinoni met with religious leaders and visited a Catholic orphanage.  While their main goal was to interact with the locals, the Chaplains also ministered to the needs of their own team:

“There is religious diversity here, but no synagogues, which make me glad Chaplain Cutler could visit,” said Chief Petty Officer Richard Anthonissen…

Cutler was able to serve Anthonissen in a way that only a rabbi can.

“During my last [CTFJ-HOA] tour, there were only Jewish lay-leaders available,” said Anthonissen. “While they meet your faith needs, a rabbi is much more – a rabbi is a teacher who makes you think and challenge your assumptions in a good way.”

Elsewhere, Chaplain (MajGen) Cecil Richardson, Read more

Finding a Church, Part 3: Leaving a Church

Being a Christian in the military sometimes creates challenges in situations civilians take for granted.  For example, how do you find a church?  The concept of a “home church” and steady lifelong attendance takes on a whole new meaning when you move every two to four years.

This is the third article in a series of suggestions and guidance on finding a church as you move about in your military career.  The first, Part 1: The Military Chapel, discussed the various perspectives and thoughts on attending services at the base/post military chapel.  The second, Part 2: Worshipping at Local Churches, addressed the topic of local/community churches a military Christian might choose to visit.  This final article discusses the sometimes controversial topic of “leaving” a church.

There used to be an old military Academy gripe that cadets were judged unfairly:  Read more

Buddhist Spouse on Life in the Military

The Buddhist Military Sangha recently published an interview with a Buddhist Navy spouse on being “married to the military.”  While much of the interview is, understandably, on the topic of roles and relationships, there were some interesting statements on faith and the military.

The interviewee is Mrs. Barbara Zaragoza, a practicing convert to Zen Buddhism and a “Navy wife.”

On being stationed overseas, away from her usual religious support:  Read more

Rock Beyond Belief: The Truth Comes Out

Apparently, Michael Weinstein of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation thinks atheists need special government support to be considered “equal” with Christians.

The media has had a chance to digest the accusations the US Army post at Fort Bragg discriminated against atheists in their treatment of “Rock Beyond Belief,” and apparently interviewed those involved.

Doesn’t look good for Weinstein and his MRFF crowd.

“I think it all boils down to money,” [Col Stephen] Sicinski said Read more

Finding a Church, Part 2: Worshipping at Local Churches

Being a Christian in the military sometimes creates challenges in situations civilians take for granted.  For example, how do you find a church?  The concept of a “home church” and steady lifelong attendance takes on a whole new meaning when you move every two to four years.

This is the second article in a series of suggestions and guidance on finding a church as you move about in your military career.  The first, Part 1: The Military Chapel, discussed the various perspectives and thoughts on attending services at the base/post military chapel.  The topic of Part 2 is local/community churches a military Christian might choose to visit at a new or temporary assignment.

Attending a Local Church  Read more

Finding a Church, Part 1: The Military Chapel

Being a Christian in the military sometimes creates challenges in situations civilians take for granted.  For example, how do you find a church?  The concept of a “home church” and steady lifelong attendance takes on a whole new meaning when you move every two to four years.

As a military Christian, the single most important thing you can do when you arrive at a new assignment is establish your spiritual support, and finding a church is crucial to that end.  There are many options and no single correct answer.  Some people prefer the locale and access of the military chapel; others, the non-military feel of community churches.  Each option has its positives and negatives — the only ‘bad’ choice is to do nothing.

The Base Chapel

As a military Christian, when you arrive at a new assignment your  Read more

Gazette Slams Weinstein’s USAFA Lawsuit

The editorial page of the Colorado Springs Gazette, local to the US Air Force Academy, came down with both feet on Michael Weinstein’s MRFF, clearly saying Weinstein’s group “opposes the free exercise of religion in government.”  The article, entitled “Anti-religion suit is based on a myth,” was written by editor Wayne Laugesen in response to Weinstein’s lawsuit precipitated by the invitation USMC Lt (Ret) Clebe McClary to the Academy National Prayer Luncheon.  Laugesen said

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation, a group that opposes the free exercise of religion in government, is suing U.S. Air Force Academy Superintendent Lt. Gen. Michael Gould in an effort to forcefully censor an evangelical Christian from speaking at the National Prayer Luncheon — a private event scheduled for Feb. 10 at the academy. (emphasis added)

The paper also jabbed at Weinstein’s lawyer and Weinstein’s own demonstrated record in the American judicial system:  Read more

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