Tag Archives: albert mohler

Military Religious Freedom at Ted Cruz Rally

A religious freedom rally hosted by GOP Presidential Candidate Ted Cruz last week in Iowa was focused largely on businesses who were sued or driven out of business by homosexual activists intent on forcing others to support their lifestyle choices.

However, there were two notable inclusions whose antagonist was actually the US government:

Former Atlanta Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran, who was fired for his views in what Dr. Al Mohler said was evidence of “erotic liberty” superseding religious liberty; and  Read more

Supreme Court Restricts Marriage, and No One Notices

Update: As Chief Justice John Roberts predicted: Inspired by SCOTUS ruling, polygamous Montana trio applies for wedding license.


While some have hailed the US Supreme Court‘s ruling last week (available in PDF here) that expanded the legal definition of marriage to include homosexuals, few have noted Justice Anthony Kennedy’s careful wording that actually restricted the definition of marriage:

The Fourteenth Amendment requires a State to license a marriage between two people of the same sex and to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex… Read more

Mohler: There’s Nowhere to Hide

Dr. Al Mohler, president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary:

This is a moment of decision, and every evangelical believer, congregation, denomination, and institution will have to answer. There will be no place to hide. The forces driving this revolution in morality will not allow evasion or equivocation. Every pastor, every church, and every Christian organization will soon be forced to declare an allegiance to the Scriptures and to the Bible’s teachings on marriage and sexual morality, or to affirm loyalty to the sexual revolution. That revolution did not start with same-sex marriage, and it will not end there. But marriage is the most urgent issue of the day, and the moment of decision has arrived.

In this season of testing, Christians committed to the gospel of Christ are called upon to muster the greatest display of compassion and conviction of our lives. But true compassion will never lead to an abandonment of biblical authority or a redefinition of the gospel of Jesus Christ

No one, especially in a position of leadership, will be able to fly under the radar on this issue…

The issues before us are compelling and urgent. The Bible is clear. Are you ready to give an answer?

Read more.

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Transgender Soldier Cites Christian Faith

The Colorado Springs Gazette covered local Fort Carson Soldier Staff Sgt Peter/Patricia King, who was born biologically male but now presents himself as female. In one respect, this is becoming so common that it almost isn’t newsworthy. On the other, the media attention is understandable given the US military’s current “transition” on transgender issues.

What make’s King’s story notable, though, is his constant reference to his religious faith. As cited in the article [emphasis added]:

“Being transgender doesn’t make me a pervert. It doesn’t make me a fetishist. It doesn’t make me a bad person, a bad soldier, a bad parent, or a bad Christian.” – from Patricia King’s blog…

She’s a father, a soldier, a Christian

The hardest part of King’s journey may have been balancing her gender with her beliefs. A church-going Christian, King worried that her internal conflict with manhood was also a conflict with God.

In faith, though, she found shelter. At Vista Grande Community Church, Read more

Christianity on Marriage, Divorce, and Homosexuality

Drs. Al Mohler and Russell Moore wrote in March on the topic of whether Christians are “hypocrites” for publicly opposing “same-sex marriage” while re-married divorcees make up large portions of their congregations. In short, Dr. Moore made the point that even if how they got there wasn’t right, the relationship between remarried men and women was still a marriage, in the Biblical definition.

The Southern Baptist Convention recently voted to break fellowship with a Southern California church that chose a “Third Way,” claiming they took no position as a church on “same-sex marriage.” The SBC disagreed and severed the relationship. Mohler and Moore again wrote on the topic of homosexuality and Biblical marriage in the Read more

Can You be Both Gay and Christian?

Update: Dr. Mohler’s column was actually part of a Southern Baptist Theological Seminary e-book published the same day as, and as a response to, Vines’ book.  The 100-page SBTS e-book is available for free here (PDF).

The other contributors are: James M. Hamilton Jr., professor of biblical theology; Denny Burk, professor of biblical studies; Owen Strachan, assistant professor of Christian theology and church history; and Heath Lambert, assistant professor of biblical counseling.

Mohler’s chapter provides an overview critique of Vines’ argument, while Hamilton primarily addresses Old Testament claims, Burk deals with New Testament claims, Strachan looks at the church history assertions and Lambert answers the question whether there is such a thing as a “gay Christian.”


As human sexuality has become a more commonplace topic in the recent few years, a substantial part of the conversation has covered the nexus between Christianity and homosexuality.

At its root, Can one be a homosexual and a Christian?

Jars of Clay lead singer Dan Haseltine caused a firestorm when he tweeted statements that were interpreted as either ambivalent about or supportive of homosexual marriage. The topic gained more steam with the recent publication of a book by self-described homosexual Christian Matthew Vines.

Dr. Al Mohler of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary responded, noting foremost that there are many who describe themselves as Christians who are yearning for a way to rationalize their faith and an endorsement of homosexuality:  Read more

Moore, Mohler on Prayer and the Constitution

Dr. Al Mohler, president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Dr. Russell Moore, president of the SBC’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, both recently wrote fascinating pieces on the recent Supreme Court decision permitting “sectarian” prayer before legislative bodies. While he makes many good points, Mohler astutely highlights, and Moore focused entirely upon, one point that affects even the US military: calls from some that public prayers — for example, those in front of a military formation — must be “generic.”

The second very important argument made by Justice Kennedy is even more perceptive and, in the long run, more important. He asserted that the government has no competence under the Constitution to evaluate prayers in terms of content. Specifically, he said that the Establishment Clause actually would prevent the government from determining the content of any prayer — especially in terms of some supposed standard of nonsectarianism.

Put bluntly, government has no right to declare that the only God welcome in public is a “generic God.” That is a profoundly important constitutional argument…

The US government can no more create Read more

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