Tag Archives: british

“Faith Has No Uniform”: Islamic Advisor Visits US Marines

Asim Hafiz, an Imam and religious advisor to the British Ministry of Defence, recently visited Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, and took the time to meet with Islamic US Marines.

While the entire event is very benign, the comments in the article actually highlighted a very basic concept behind the importance of faith in the military and the service of military chaplains:

“Anytime you meet another Muslim it’s exciting,” said Master Sgt. Anetra Cargile…“It’s like meeting someone from Continue reading

Military Can Lead Society on Morals, Ethics

Society has so much lost its moral compass that one General officer says the military can no longer assume its recruits will enlist with an acceptable level of core moral behavior.

General Lord Dannatt, a former head of the British Army, said this about the British society and its military.  He proposes that the military

can teach society about the importance of ethics and morality.

Dannatt says “mental and moral preparation” is as important as physical Continue reading

The Cross in Afghanistan

A British military photographer captured a stunning and unique vista in Afghanistan, at the main British base at Camp Bastion.

Afghanistan is entering its ‘rainy season,’ and such storms may be relatively common for some time.

Of course, Michael Weinstein Continue reading

UK Chaplains Serve in Afghanistan

The UK Guardian‘s Riazat Butt continued her reporting on religion in the British forces in Afghanistan with an article on the UK chaplaincy, which is similar to the chaplaincy in the US military, but with some significant differences.  Still, the content of the fairly long article is interesting.

Noting the importance of the ministry of presence by chaplains (who are, in fact, on the “front lines” with the troops):  Continue reading

US and UK Military Religion in Afghanistan

An interesting set of articles in the UK Guardian notes the role of religion in the military in Afghanistan.  The articles were written by Riazat Butt, who is reportedly traveling through Afghanistan with Army Chaplains.

The tone of her first article, from the British outpost at Camp Bastion, implies that the majority of British servicemembers eschew religion except for the rituals associated with the loss of a comrade.

Last Wednesday evening, thousands of troops gathered to remember Lt Daniel John Clack…in a 30-minute ceremony that wove together Christian and military liturgy. For many in attendance, the vigils will be their only regular exposure to religion whether on deployment or in Civvy Street.

The memorial monument bears a shining cross made from expended shell casings.

British Sergeant Ryan Coleman described the attitude this way:  Continue reading